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Should Bennett Apologize?
No, the man was racially profiled just like Michael Brown
2
15%
Maybe, I'm waiting for more testimony, evidence and video
0
No votes
Yes, he owes the LVMPD an apology
11
85%
 
Total votes : 13

Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby HawkBowler on Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:01 am

Michael K 2 wrote:Once again, you mis the point. But you are right, my comments on a forum with about twelve people conversing is the reason their protest is misunderstood. :roll:


That get's me too because the majority opinion is against the protesting. Even among the players, in a league that's 75% black, only 30 players are protesting.

Should see the interview with Don Lemon below where he goes off the rails:

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/don-lemon-h ... giving-me/

The left is trying so desperately to argue that demonstrating against the flag is not disrespectful. Most of the country is not buying it.

To use an analogy.... We have a rule at our dinner table that you can't wear a hat. Not sure exactly why, but that's how I was raised. If one of my son's friends comes over for dinner and he's wearing a hat, I will ask him to remove it. Why? Because it's disrespectful of our rules and dinner table (platform). He could argue that he has a really important message on his hat that everyone at the table should see, but I would still say that this is not the time and place for that. The anthem is the same deal. Players don't have the right to use the NFL dinner table to give a voice to their causes. Why? It's not their dinner table.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby D-Trains on Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:20 am

HawkBowler wrote:
Michael K 2 wrote:Once again, you mis the point. But you are right, my comments on a forum with about twelve people conversing is the reason their protest is misunderstood. :roll:


That get's me too because the majority opinion is against the protesting. Even among the players, in a league that's 75% black, only 30 players are protesting.

Should see the interview with Don Lemon below where he goes off the rails:

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/don-lemon-h ... giving-me/

The left is trying so desperately to argue that demonstrating against the flag is not disrespectful. Most of the country is not buying it.

To use an analogy.... We have a rule at our dinner table that you can't wear a hat. Not sure exactly why, but that's how I was raised. If one of my son's friends comes over for dinner and he's wearing a hat, I will ask him to remove it. Why? Because it's disrespectful of our rules and dinner table (platform). He could argue that he has a really important message on his hat that everyone at the table should see, but I would still say that this is not the time and place for that. The anthem is the same deal. Players don't have the right to use the NFL dinner table to give a voice to their causes. Why? It's not their dinner table.


My God. Lemon saying that nobody thought it was disrespectful until Trump said it was. How can he say that blatant ignorant lie with a straight face. :shock: :shock: :shock: :? :? :? :| :| :|
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby HawkBowler on Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:23 am

D-Trains wrote:
My God. Lemon saying that nobody thought it was disrespectful until Trump said it was. How can he say that blatant ignorant lie with a straight face. :shock: :shock: :shock: :? :? :? :| :| :|


I watched that live last night. Couldn't believe how unhinged he's become. Don is an anchor who's supposed to moderate discussion panels, and yet he interrupts and injects his opinions all the time. And he doesn't just state his opinion, he usually tells the one guy who's not a social justice warrior that he can't tell lies on his show... :shock: ...LOL.

Did you read the comments under that link? Most of them agree with Lemon.

redjoy wrote:You do not have the right to say anything you want at work, you can get fired for that! What your job cannot do is present the flag or play the national anthem over the loudspeaker and demand that you stand or salute. Transversely, they cannot fire you for standing, saluting or kneeling. #getwoke
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby Moe Gibbs on Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:45 am

D-Trains wrote:
HawkBowler wrote:
My God. Lemon saying that nobody thought it was disrespectful until Trump said it was. How can he say that blatant ignorant lie with a straight face. :shock: :shock: :shock: :? :? :? :| :| :|


The entire movement is based on lies and deception.
The premise is always that the Negro Martyr "Dindu Nuffinz".
Here is a recap of what the BLM is based on.
This article is taken from a website [Claremont Independent] that Google hasn't shut down or disabled search results yet, or that the SPLC Fascists haven't added to their "Hate Speech Crime" catalog yet...


"Not a month goes by without Black Lives Matter dubbing another Black American a martyr of the fight for Black equality. This month, their martyrs are Sylville K. Smith and Korryn Gaines: two armed, long-time criminals who resisted arrest. Smith, a man with a lengthy rap sheet, was pulled over at a traffic stop and fled his car while armed with a stolen gun in an area with poor police-civilian relations. Gaines was fatally shot two weeks ago after threatening to kill police officers who arrived at her house with a warrant for her arrest. Gaines pointed a Mossberg 12-gauge shotgun at the responding officers who did not shoot her initially. Using her gun and her five-year old son as a human meat-shield, she presented enough of a threat to the police that a SWAT team was deployed to her house and ultimately shot and killed her.

Black social media, The Huffington Post, and other Leftist, Afrocentric news sources have spun these stories as evidence of White supremacy and “systemic racism.” Violent protests erupted Saturday night in Milwaukee, Smith’s hometown. The protesters destroyed businesses and targeted White people for beatings while chanting Black Lives Matter slogans. Black Lives Matter and its supporters have decided that any African-American shot by a cop or a White civilian—regardless of circumstance or just cause—is a martyr. Almost all of these “martyrs” have been just like Smith and Gaines: violent criminals who threatened an officer’s life.

Here are the unadulterated stories of BLM’s other heroes:

Bruce Kelley Jr., a man with a lengthy rap sheet, was drinking publicly with his father in a busway gazebo. When approached by police officers with a ticket for drinking in public, Kelley Jr. began to walk away and then, after being told to stop, rushed the officers. Attempts to tase Kelley Jr. failed because of his heavy coat. A K-9 unit then pursued Kelley Jr., who stabbed the dog as it grasped his arm. He was then shot and killed by a pursuing sergeant.
Meagan Hockaday, a domestically-abusive mother and the fiancée of the 911 caller, was shot after charging at the responding officer with a knife less than twenty seconds after he arrived at her apartment.
Charley Leundeu Keunang, a homeless, mentally-ill, illegal Cameroonian immigrant, threatened a 911 caller reporting a nearby robbery as soon as responding officers arrived. After ignoring commands and being increasingly aggressive—at one point, even reaching for an officer’s gun—Keunang fought with police and was shot and killed.
Ezell Ford, a mentally-ill man pursued by two police officers for erratic behavior, attacked an officer approaching him and attempted to reach for the officer’s gun while being subdued. The other officer shot Ford out of fear for his partner’s life.
Michael Brown, a young man who had just stolen cigarillos from a local store and threatened the store’s owner, was stopped by a responding officer who noticed that he and his friend fit the description of the suspect of the robbery. Brown rushed the officer, fighting for the officer’s gun, and was fatally shot.
Jonathan Ferrell, a man who crashed his car while drunk-driving, banged on the door of a stranger’s house. The homeowner called the police, and when they arrived, Ferrell charged at them. First, they used a taser to subdue him, but because it missed, the officers resorted to shooting him.
Those mentioned above had charged at the responding officers. Rushing police officers after their repeated attempts to subdue a subject with words, pepper spray, or a taser is a clear threat to their lives. In a news segment on Black Lives Matter protests, a Black Lives Matter activist himself underwent use-of-force training at a police academy. After he “shot” the subject in question in various scenarios, the activist explained that he “didn’t understand how important compliance was” and that his attitude on use of force had changed. Regarding compliance, the following Black Lives Matter martyrs either disregarded a police officer’s orders, resisted arrest and failed to submit to lawful commands, or fled from the scene of the crime or traffic stop.

Alton Sterling, a man previously convicted of violent offenses which left him unable to legally obtain, own, or carry a firearm, was the subject of a 911 call in which a homeless person reported that a man selling CDs had threatened him with a handgun. Sterling’s possession of the firearm and his non-compliance after repeated attempts by police to suppress him through various non-lethal means led to his death.
Jamar Clark, a man previously convicted of first-degree aggravated assault and awaiting trial for a high-speed chase arrest, was breaking up a fight between the host of a party and his ex-girlfriend who had obtained a Domestic Abuse No Contact Order against him. Clark pulled his ex-girlfriend away from prying eyes and battered her, prompting an onlooker to call for paramedics. Not only did Clark try to interfere with his ex-girlfriend being escorted to the ambulance, he attacked the police officer who tried to hold him back—which ultimately resulted in his death.
Freddie Gray, a man with many arrests and citations on his rap sheet, five of which were then active warrants, fled from police in a high-crime area in possession of an illegal switchblade. He sustained fatal injuries after a rough ride in the back of a Baltimore Police Department van, during which he was cuffed but not wearing a seatbelt.
Eric Courtney Harris was fatally shot by a reserve sheriff’s deputy while running from a sting operation to arrest him for drug- and arms-dealing. The deputy claimed that he had confused his taser for his gun.
Jeramie Reid, pulled over after running through a stop sign, moved around the car against the orders of the police officer after disclosing he had a gun in the glove compartment. After the officer retrieved the gun, Reid attempted to exit the vehicle without the prior instruction of the officer, but the officer kept the door closed, wary that Reid may have had a second weapon on him in the car. Again, without prior instruction, Reid attempted to exit the vehicle—this time after the officer had moved back—and as Reid exited the car, he was shot.
Tamir Rice, a young boy playing with an Airsoft pistol with the orange safety tip removed, pointed his toy gun at passersby and the police when they arrived. Not knowing it was fake, the police shot Rice.
Eric Garner, a man selling loose cigarettes without tax stamps, resisted arrest until the responding officer took him down and put him in a submission hold until he passed out. Garner was obese, and had asthma and heart disease, which contributed to his death.
Of those listed above, each of whom was shot by a White police officer—a demographic around which Black Lives Matter constructed much of their central narrative—the only cases in which the officers were not charged were those of Brown, Rice, Clark, Kelley Jr., and Sterling—all of whom were killed justifiably without evidence of misconduct. In the cases of Harris and Gray, the White officers were respectively charged with second-degree manslaughter and second-degree depraved-heart murder along with involuntary manslaughter.

While the majority of Black Lives Matter’s heroes were justly killed, there are some examples of clear-cut police misconduct. Yet, in each of these following instances—except in the case of Boyd’s shooter who was found not guilty due to an atypical directed verdict—each officer was placed on leave pending investigation, fired, sentenced to up to fifteen years in jail, and fired, respectively. Bland’s suicide would have been noticed sooner had the police either properly conducted their hourly rounds or put her on suicide watch; given her multiple past suicide attempts, it would have been protocol to check on her every fifteen minutes. Their failure to do so was indeed a policy violation, but there is no evidence that systemic racism is to blame for her death; both the state trooper and sheriff involved were fired.

Philando Castile, a man pulled over in a traffic stop, was killed by an officer after disclosing he was legally armed, and then moving his hands as one officer told him not to move while the other officer had told him to show his license and registration.
Corey Jones was killed by a plainclothes officer while waiting by his car after it had broken down. While doing burglary surveillance, the officer claimed that he was confronted by an armed subject—evidently Jones—but he gunned down Jones without probable cause.
Akai Gurley, a resident of one of the most dangerous housing developments in New York City, was accidentally shot by a rookie officer while patrolling his building.
Rekia Boyd, a young woman out with her friends, was shot at a distance by an off-duty detective who claims Boyd’s boyfriend’s cell phone appeared to be a gun.
Sandra Bland, an avid Black Lives Matter supporter with a history of suicide attempts and a lengthy rap sheet of misdemeanors, was found dead in her jail cell after she hanged herself with a bed sheet. She had been pulled over for failing to signal a lane change, but was ultimately arrested after assaulting an officer and resisting arrest at the traffic stop.
The following were all killed by civilians, so to use their deaths as evidence of racism in police conduct is nonsensical. McBride’s death, in particular, was likely avoidable and unnecessary, and a jury agreed with this sentiment, sentencing her shooter to seventeen to thirty-two years in prison. This punishment goes against the Black Lives Matter narrative that the justice system perpetuates systemic racism and fails to punish oppressors.

Renisha McBride, a young woman who drunkenly crashed her car in the middle of the night, banged on the door of a stranger’s house looking for help. The resident of the home thought McBride was breaking in and shot her with his shotgun.
Jordan Davis, a high schooler who started a verbal altercation with a civilian after refusing to turn down his music, reportedly pulled out a shotgun and was then shot by the person with whom he was arguing.
Trayvon Martin, an unarmed, hoodie-clad high schooler pursued by the community’s watchman through his gated community, attacked him after being provoked. After a violent struggle between the two, the Hispanic watchman—who claimed to be in fear for his life—stood his ground and shot Martin.
BLM celebrated each and every person here as a martyr, as if each individual contributed meaningfully to Black America and our fight for equality. But instead, we find that almost all of Black Lives Matter’s martyrs were mentally ill, prior criminals, the subject of a 911 call reporting a criminal act, or pursued by police for doing something illegal. These are not role models for our community. By glorifying the deaths of Black people who were killed under justifiable circumstances and failed to comply with lawful orders from police officers, Black Lives Matter is damaging the credibility of its argument against police brutality and doing a disservice to those seeking justice for actually unjust killings by police.

Black Lives Matter would have a much more compelling case if they were willing to concede that shootings by police can be—and often are—justified. Refocusing on issues at specific police departments—such as poor training (notably in the cases of Gurley and Harris) and bias due to the statistically disproportionate amount of crime committed by Black Americans—would give them more legitimacy and have more of an impact on the national discourse on crime, policing, and police brutality.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby HawkBowler on Thu Oct 12, 2017 12:05 pm

Michael Brown, a young man who had just stolen cigarillos from a local store and threatened the store’s owner, was stopped by a responding officer who noticed that he and his friend fit the description of the suspect of the robbery. Brown rushed the officer, fighting for the officer’s gun, and was fatally shot.


It's important to get the facts right. Concerning the bold above, it's my understanding that Darren Wilson confronted Michael Brown and his friend because they were walking in the middle of the street. Wilson had received a report of a robbery, but it was not the store where Brown stole the cigarillos.

Black Lives Matter would have a much more compelling case if they were willing to concede that shootings by police can be—and often are—justified. Refocusing on issues at specific police departments—such as poor training (notably in the cases of Gurley and Harris) and bias due to the statistically disproportionate amount of crime committed by Black Americans—would give them more legitimacy and have more of an impact on the national discourse on crime, policing, and police brutality.


This advise is counter-productive to the goals of BLM. It's not about police brutality. If that were the case, they would have been satisfied with the efforts of Obama's DOJ that cracked down on every PD behind the shootings. We saw the same playbook each time -- first, a black man is shot and killed (circumstances are not important), then BLM moves in to riot, then Obama's DOJ drops the hammer on whichever PD is involved. Happened in Furgeson, Baltimore, and even in Seattle.

The details are not important to BLM. In fact, they don't want to go into details at all. That's why they stick to abstract accusations of oppression and racism. What was important for them is to keep showing these incidents on a national scale. Since ONLY incidents of black people getting killed were showed, they created the illusion that these things only happen to black people. And it worked. I've heard countless comments from people marching with BLM that spout the same ignorance, 'why is it only happening to black people?' They also believe 'hands up don't shoot' even though those claims have been thoroughly debunked by the eyewitness testimony of black people.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby calabcoug on Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:11 pm

Moe Gibbs wrote:
D-Trains wrote:
HawkBowler wrote:
My God. Lemon saying that nobody thought it was disrespectful until Trump said it was. How can he say that blatant ignorant lie with a straight face. :shock: :shock: :shock: :? :? :? :| :| :|


The entire movement is based on lies and deception.
The premise is always that the Negro Martyr "Dindu Nuffinz".
Here is a recap of what the BLM is based on.
This article is taken from a website [Claremont Independent] that Google hasn't shut down or disabled search results yet, or that the SPLC Fascists haven't added to their "Hate Speech Crime" catalog yet...


"Not a month goes by without Black Lives Matter dubbing another Black American a martyr of the fight for Black equality. This month, their martyrs are Sylville K. Smith and Korryn Gaines: two armed, long-time criminals who resisted arrest. Smith, a man with a lengthy rap sheet, was pulled over at a traffic stop and fled his car while armed with a stolen gun in an area with poor police-civilian relations. Gaines was fatally shot two weeks ago after threatening to kill police officers who arrived at her house with a warrant for her arrest. Gaines pointed a Mossberg 12-gauge shotgun at the responding officers who did not shoot her initially. Using her gun and her five-year old son as a human meat-shield, she presented enough of a threat to the police that a SWAT team was deployed to her house and ultimately shot and killed her.

Black social media, The Huffington Post, and other Leftist, Afrocentric news sources have spun these stories as evidence of White supremacy and “systemic racism.” Violent protests erupted Saturday night in Milwaukee, Smith’s hometown. The protesters destroyed businesses and targeted White people for beatings while chanting Black Lives Matter slogans. Black Lives Matter and its supporters have decided that any African-American shot by a cop or a White civilian—regardless of circumstance or just cause—is a martyr. Almost all of these “martyrs” have been just like Smith and Gaines: violent criminals who threatened an officer’s life.

Here are the unadulterated stories of BLM’s other heroes:

Bruce Kelley Jr., a man with a lengthy rap sheet, was drinking publicly with his father in a busway gazebo. When approached by police officers with a ticket for drinking in public, Kelley Jr. began to walk away and then, after being told to stop, rushed the officers. Attempts to tase Kelley Jr. failed because of his heavy coat. A K-9 unit then pursued Kelley Jr., who stabbed the dog as it grasped his arm. He was then shot and killed by a pursuing sergeant.
Meagan Hockaday, a domestically-abusive mother and the fiancée of the 911 caller, was shot after charging at the responding officer with a knife less than twenty seconds after he arrived at her apartment.
Charley Leundeu Keunang, a homeless, mentally-ill, illegal Cameroonian immigrant, threatened a 911 caller reporting a nearby robbery as soon as responding officers arrived. After ignoring commands and being increasingly aggressive—at one point, even reaching for an officer’s gun—Keunang fought with police and was shot and killed.
Ezell Ford, a mentally-ill man pursued by two police officers for erratic behavior, attacked an officer approaching him and attempted to reach for the officer’s gun while being subdued. The other officer shot Ford out of fear for his partner’s life.
Michael Brown, a young man who had just stolen cigarillos from a local store and threatened the store’s owner, was stopped by a responding officer who noticed that he and his friend fit the description of the suspect of the robbery. Brown rushed the officer, fighting for the officer’s gun, and was fatally shot.
Jonathan Ferrell, a man who crashed his car while drunk-driving, banged on the door of a stranger’s house. The homeowner called the police, and when they arrived, Ferrell charged at them. First, they used a taser to subdue him, but because it missed, the officers resorted to shooting him.
Those mentioned above had charged at the responding officers. Rushing police officers after their repeated attempts to subdue a subject with words, pepper spray, or a taser is a clear threat to their lives. In a news segment on Black Lives Matter protests, a Black Lives Matter activist himself underwent use-of-force training at a police academy. After he “shot” the subject in question in various scenarios, the activist explained that he “didn’t understand how important compliance was” and that his attitude on use of force had changed. Regarding compliance, the following Black Lives Matter martyrs either disregarded a police officer’s orders, resisted arrest and failed to submit to lawful commands, or fled from the scene of the crime or traffic stop.

Alton Sterling, a man previously convicted of violent offenses which left him unable to legally obtain, own, or carry a firearm, was the subject of a 911 call in which a homeless person reported that a man selling CDs had threatened him with a handgun. Sterling’s possession of the firearm and his non-compliance after repeated attempts by police to suppress him through various non-lethal means led to his death.
Jamar Clark, a man previously convicted of first-degree aggravated assault and awaiting trial for a high-speed chase arrest, was breaking up a fight between the host of a party and his ex-girlfriend who had obtained a Domestic Abuse No Contact Order against him. Clark pulled his ex-girlfriend away from prying eyes and battered her, prompting an onlooker to call for paramedics. Not only did Clark try to interfere with his ex-girlfriend being escorted to the ambulance, he attacked the police officer who tried to hold him back—which ultimately resulted in his death.
Freddie Gray, a man with many arrests and citations on his rap sheet, five of which were then active warrants, fled from police in a high-crime area in possession of an illegal switchblade. He sustained fatal injuries after a rough ride in the back of a Baltimore Police Department van, during which he was cuffed but not wearing a seatbelt.
Eric Courtney Harris was fatally shot by a reserve sheriff’s deputy while running from a sting operation to arrest him for drug- and arms-dealing. The deputy claimed that he had confused his taser for his gun.
Jeramie Reid, pulled over after running through a stop sign, moved around the car against the orders of the police officer after disclosing he had a gun in the glove compartment. After the officer retrieved the gun, Reid attempted to exit the vehicle without the prior instruction of the officer, but the officer kept the door closed, wary that Reid may have had a second weapon on him in the car. Again, without prior instruction, Reid attempted to exit the vehicle—this time after the officer had moved back—and as Reid exited the car, he was shot.
Tamir Rice, a young boy playing with an Airsoft pistol with the orange safety tip removed, pointed his toy gun at passersby and the police when they arrived. Not knowing it was fake, the police shot Rice.
Eric Garner, a man selling loose cigarettes without tax stamps, resisted arrest until the responding officer took him down and put him in a submission hold until he passed out. Garner was obese, and had asthma and heart disease, which contributed to his death.
Of those listed above, each of whom was shot by a White police officer—a demographic around which Black Lives Matter constructed much of their central narrative—the only cases in which the officers were not charged were those of Brown, Rice, Clark, Kelley Jr., and Sterling—all of whom were killed justifiably without evidence of misconduct. In the cases of Harris and Gray, the White officers were respectively charged with second-degree manslaughter and second-degree depraved-heart murder along with involuntary manslaughter.

While the majority of Black Lives Matter’s heroes were justly killed, there are some examples of clear-cut police misconduct. Yet, in each of these following instances—except in the case of Boyd’s shooter who was found not guilty due to an atypical directed verdict—each officer was placed on leave pending investigation, fired, sentenced to up to fifteen years in jail, and fired, respectively. Bland’s suicide would have been noticed sooner had the police either properly conducted their hourly rounds or put her on suicide watch; given her multiple past suicide attempts, it would have been protocol to check on her every fifteen minutes. Their failure to do so was indeed a policy violation, but there is no evidence that systemic racism is to blame for her death; both the state trooper and sheriff involved were fired.

Philando Castile, a man pulled over in a traffic stop, was killed by an officer after disclosing he was legally armed, and then moving his hands as one officer told him not to move while the other officer had told him to show his license and registration.
Corey Jones was killed by a plainclothes officer while waiting by his car after it had broken down. While doing burglary surveillance, the officer claimed that he was confronted by an armed subject—evidently Jones—but he gunned down Jones without probable cause.
Akai Gurley, a resident of one of the most dangerous housing developments in New York City, was accidentally shot by a rookie officer while patrolling his building.
Rekia Boyd, a young woman out with her friends, was shot at a distance by an off-duty detective who claims Boyd’s boyfriend’s cell phone appeared to be a gun.
Sandra Bland, an avid Black Lives Matter supporter with a history of suicide attempts and a lengthy rap sheet of misdemeanors, was found dead in her jail cell after she hanged herself with a bed sheet. She had been pulled over for failing to signal a lane change, but was ultimately arrested after assaulting an officer and resisting arrest at the traffic stop.
The following were all killed by civilians, so to use their deaths as evidence of racism in police conduct is nonsensical. McBride’s death, in particular, was likely avoidable and unnecessary, and a jury agreed with this sentiment, sentencing her shooter to seventeen to thirty-two years in prison. This punishment goes against the Black Lives Matter narrative that the justice system perpetuates systemic racism and fails to punish oppressors.

Renisha McBride, a young woman who drunkenly crashed her car in the middle of the night, banged on the door of a stranger’s house looking for help. The resident of the home thought McBride was breaking in and shot her with his shotgun.
Jordan Davis, a high schooler who started a verbal altercation with a civilian after refusing to turn down his music, reportedly pulled out a shotgun and was then shot by the person with whom he was arguing.
Trayvon Martin, an unarmed, hoodie-clad high schooler pursued by the community’s watchman through his gated community, attacked him after being provoked. After a violent struggle between the two, the Hispanic watchman—who claimed to be in fear for his life—stood his ground and shot Martin.
BLM celebrated each and every person here as a martyr, as if each individual contributed meaningfully to Black America and our fight for equality. But instead, we find that almost all of Black Lives Matter’s martyrs were mentally ill, prior criminals, the subject of a 911 call reporting a criminal act, or pursued by police for doing something illegal. These are not role models for our community. By glorifying the deaths of Black people who were killed under justifiable circumstances and failed to comply with lawful orders from police officers, Black Lives Matter is damaging the credibility of its argument against police brutality and doing a disservice to those seeking justice for actually unjust killings by police.

Black Lives Matter would have a much more compelling case if they were willing to concede that shootings by police can be—and often are—justified. Refocusing on issues at specific police departments—such as poor training (notably in the cases of Gurley and Harris) and bias due to the statistically disproportionate amount of crime committed by Black Americans—would give them more legitimacy and have more of an impact on the national discourse on crime, policing, and police brutality.


Said the admitted racist. :roll:
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby Moe Gibbs on Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:25 pm

calabcoug wrote:Said the admitted racist. :roll:


Moe Gibbs wrote:
calabcoug wrote:
Moe Gibbs wrote:Calab your comments were specifically... "Calabasas is an absolutely wonderful, racially diverse melting pot".
LA County was never part of that discussion.
Aurora chimed in later to confirm how ridiculous your statement about Calabasas was


Good grief- I never used any such words. You just post these utter lies.. Aurora weighed in? Another lie.


auroraave wrote: on Mon Mar 27, 2017

By the way Moe - I DID chime in about Calabassas. I remember that discussion clearly. It is not a big racial melting pot. The Valley - all along the 101 corridor (Calabassas, Agoura, Thousand Oaks, Westlake), Simi Valley, Santa Clarita - are predominantly white suburbs. I know. I f'n live down here. Van Nuys may be 'diverse' but calabassas, outside of the standard Latino population all SoCal areas enjoy, is not a melting pot. Some of those areas I listed are the whitest places in SoCal outside of Orange County.



Calab does so much lying he can't keep track of it all..
It looks like Joan is signed in here once again to save Calab's Lying Bacon and to delete this thread.LOL.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby calabcoug on Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:28 pm

HawkBowler wrote:
Michael K 2 wrote:Once again, you mis the point. But you are right, my comments on a forum with about twelve people conversing is the reason their protest is misunderstood. :roll:


That get's me too because the majority opinion is against the protesting. Even among the players, in a league that's 75% black, only 30 players are protesting.

Should see the interview with Don Lemon below where he goes off the rails:

https://www.mediaite.com/tv/don-lemon-h ... giving-me/

The left is trying so desperately to argue that demonstrating against the flag is not disrespectful. Most of the country is not buying it.

To use an analogy.... We have a rule at our dinner table that you can't wear a hat. Not sure exactly why, but that's how I was raised. If one of my son's friends comes over for dinner and he's wearing a hat, I will ask him to remove it. Why? Because it's disrespectful of our rules and dinner table (platform). He could argue that he has a really important message on his hat that everyone at the table should see, but I would still say that this is not the time and place for that. The anthem is the same deal. Players don't have the right to use the NFL dinner table to give a voice to their causes. Why? It's not their dinner table.


Yeah...it's the 1st amendment simple simon, not a dinner table. Vast difference. I love the bolded part- so mind bogglingly obtuse and you can't even grasp that it is. OF COURSE there is a majority...it is the minorities who are protesting. They are called minorities because blacks constitute 12% of the US population. Claiming a majority rule in a race debate is typical of your lack of intelligence beyond what Alex Jones told you.

As to your false statements about who supports and who doesn't - polling has proven you wrong...as usual. You think because you say it it is true...but it isn't...it is just your usual fib filled spin. Poll on protests...

Of the 84% supporting the players' right to protest, 49% felt they should find a different way to express their political opinions, and 35% felt that not standing for the anthem is an acceptable way to protest. There was a wide racial gap in those saying it was an acceptable form of protest.with 70% of African-American choosing that option only 28% of whites doing so.

Poll on Kap:

Forty-seven percent of respondents felt that Kaepernick is unemployed because of his protests last season while 19 percent said it was because he wasn't good enough. Among African-Americans, 81 percent cited protests for Kaepernick remaining a free agent with only seven percent saying it was because he was not good enough. Among white people, the ratio was 41 percent vs. 22 percent.

Regarding the hapless commander in tweet's comments:

When respondents were asked if they agreed more with Trump's remarks or NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and the owners, Seton Hall Sports Poll found that Trump had 28 percent support while Goodell received 50 percent. Among African-Americans Trump received six percent vs. 78 percent for Goodell, and white people were at 32 percent vs. 47 percent.

The disconnect and the utter lie that it is a protest against the military is purely a creation of the right...

These three ways of looking at the protests have colored the polling. A recent CBS/YouGov poll of over 1,300 respondents asked people — regardless of whether they agreed with the protests — what NFL players were trying to do by kneeling during the national anthem. A large majority (73 percent) of respondents said the players were trying to call attention to racism, and 69 percent said players were calling attention to police violence. But 40 percent said the protests were trying to disrespect the flag, while 33 percent said the goal was to disrespect the military.

Stop lying HB...stop spinning.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby calabcoug on Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:31 pm

Moe Gibbs wrote:
calabcoug wrote:
Moe Gibbs wrote:Calab your comments were specifically... "Calabasas is an absolutely wonderful, racially diverse melting pot".
LA County was never part of that discussion.
Aurora chimed in later to confirm how ridiculous your statement about Calabasas was


Good grief- I never used any such words. You just post these utter lies.. Aurora weighed in? Another lie.


auroraave wrote: on Mon Mar 27, 2017

By the way Moe - I DID chime in about Calabassas. I remember that discussion clearly. It is not a big racial melting pot. The Valley - all along the 101 corridor (Calabassas, Agoura, Thousand Oaks, Westlake), Simi Valley, Santa Clarita - are predominantly white suburbs. I know. I f'n live down here. Van Nuys may be 'diverse' but calabassas, outside of the standard Latino population all SoCal areas enjoy, is not a melting pot. Some of those areas I listed are the whitest places in SoCal outside of Orange County.



Calab does so much lying he can't keep track of it all..
It looks like Joan is signed in here once again to save Calab's Lying Bacon and to delete this thread.LOL.
[/quote]
_____ ____ _____
You admitted long ago on these page to being a racist. Even posted from the Klan handbook. I say it because you said it. What I find fascinating is now, like all hood wearing cowards of your ilk...you won't own it. Clearly you don't understand that by admitting your racist views, and sheer prejudice and utterly unfounded bias...you render your own takes on racism moot.
 
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Re: Should Bennett Apologize?

Postby Moe Gibbs on Thu Oct 12, 2017 4:44 pm

calabcoug wrote:You admitted long ago on these page to being a racist. Even posted from the Klan handbook. I say it because you said it. What I find fascinating is now, like all hood wearing cowards of your ilk...you won't own it. Clearly you don't understand that by admitting your racist views, and sheer prejudice and utterly unfounded bias...you render your own takes on racism moot.


Show proof of me "not owning" my racist beliefs that all races of men were not endowed / did not evolve equally...either physically or mentally.

I'll wait right here while you furnish us with that proof...LIAR BOY.

BTW, I posted this the other day in this thread just a few pages back.....

Moe Gibbs wrote:Intellectual parity [so called "equality" between the races] is a "Social Construct" that does not exist in nature.
It only exists in wishful thinking.


Keep fighting the good fight...LIAR BOY...!!!
Last edited by Moe Gibbs on Thu Oct 12, 2017 5:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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