Advertising

Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby G8Again on Mon Jan 21, 2019 10:10 am

"What MLK Knew - The Solution is Us

For most of us, January is a time to toss aside our old habits, adopt a renewed sense of purpose, and resolve to do better in the 12 months ahead. Sadly, that hasn’t been the case in Washington, where politicians rang in the new year with a needless government shutdown and endless replays of the politics-as-usual charade that made them so unproductive in 2018.

But January also brings us a powerful reminder of the way we can address seemingly intractable challenges like this. Celebrating the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., we see how the words and deeds of this great man point us toward resolving the breakdown of government and civility that has left Washington powerless to act on a multitude of problems here at home and abroad.

King and his colleagues struggled throughout the 1950s and ’60s to achieve social justice and equal rights for millions of black Americans. While the Civil War had officially abolished slavery, it didn’t end discrimination and racism; yet moving the political system to further action had become a continuing struggle.

When I reflect on King’s legacy, it’s clear that the reason he could never get politicians to create racial equality — even if they knew it was the moral thing to do — was because they feared it was too tough politically. Knowing that solutions would not, and politically could not, come from the top, he went around the politicians. He organized in neighborhoods and churches. He brought people — black and white, rich and poor, liberal and conservative — together to drive change and to bring greater unity in in communities across the nation. Because solutions would never get their start in Washington, he knew the solution had to be us.

Today, when we’re again so divided, we need to use that same approach to attack the common problems that affect all of us. With the federal government so dysfunctional and creating more problems than it’s solved, it’s up to us as individual citizens to begin to take on many of these challenges for ourselves, within our communities. Instead of waiting for Washington to work, we can bring about positive change where we live, to make things work better, in whatever ways we can.

Whether it’s drug abuse or poverty or bullying, infant mortality or poor-performing schools, we can take some matters into our own hands, right where we live. Solutions have to start in your house, in your church and your school — in your own town square. When people begin to work together on these local concerns, they begin to understand one another, respect one another, and like one another. They will rediscover their shared humanity and open their eyes and ears to the views of others. When we do that, we begin to heal our communities.

Let me cite one challenge: street gangs and violence in our cities, large and small. That’s not an ideological challenge or a partisan issue, and neither are the solutions. Ending violence is about bringing the community together. We’re seeing that with the work of former education secretary Arne Duncan, who has been working with neighborhood nonprofits in Chicago to help get young men life-coaching and job training that’s turning around lives — and communities.

Isn’t that what matters in the end? If we can help just one person to be better, we can change the entire world. And when we work together as a community to meet this challenge, who knows what we can accomplish?

Instead of sitting around worrying about what’s broken and not working in Washington, we’ve got to get off the couch and figure out what we can do by ourselves — right here at home, where we live. Volunteer at the food bank. Engage with your schools if something needs to be fixed. Drop in on a neighbor who has no one else to listen. The opportunities are there, but we need to grasp them. That’s the cure for the breakdown in Washington.

I haven’t given up hope that officeholders in Washington will eventually get their act together and, at long last, find the will to get things done on behalf of the people who elected them. Until then, let’s all make a Martin Luther King Day resolution to find ways we can begin to tackle problems in our own backyards. That is King’s message: the solution is us."

- John Kasich
Op Ed
Boston Globe
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu May 18, 2017 1:36 pm

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Bo Riley on Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:05 am

Agreed.

As Trump once said, we should "continue to reflect on the courage and vision of Martin Luther Coon Jr"
 
Posts: 871
Joined: Wed Dec 17, 2008 11:03 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby HawkBowler on Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:04 pm

MLK was a conservative Republican. If he were alive today, he would be horrified by the socialist Democrats using race to divide people.
 
Posts: 16609
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 7:46 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Coug Tracks on Mon Jan 21, 2019 1:10 pm

HawkBowler wrote:MLK was a conservative Republican. If he were alive today, he would be horrified by the socialist Democrats using race to divide people.
I have no doubt if MLK was alive today he would be horrified by both parties. Do you really believe MLK was a "conservative Republican" even in the 50s and 60s? What's your source? Here's a quote from MLK:

“I don’t think the Republican Party is a party full of the almighty God, nor is the Democratic Party. They both have weaknesses. And I’m not inextricably bound to either party.”

You seem to take history out of context to meet your political agenda.
 
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 5:53 pm
Location: Kirkland, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby HawkBowler on Mon Jan 21, 2019 2:24 pm

Coug, the Democrats switched to supporting blacks in the 1960s when JFK and Bobby stepped in to help MLK get out of jail. Before that they were the party of segregation and slavery.

MLK was a baptist preacher. Of course he was conservative. He was also Republican as were most blacks at this time.
 
Posts: 16609
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 7:46 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Coug Tracks on Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:16 pm

HawkBowler wrote:Coug, the Democrats switched to supporting blacks in the 1960s when JFK and Bobby stepped in to help MLK get out of jail. Before that they were the party of segregation and slavery.

MLK was a baptist preacher. Of course he was conservative. He was also Republican as were most blacks at this time.
It's factually inaccurate to characterize "most blacks" as Republican's at this time or whatever time you are speaking to that fits your narrative. There's was a lot of support for the "New Deal" during the post-Depression 1930's by blacks and American's in general. Democratic support post WWII most likely dipped significantly as it would have likely for American's in general. In 1956 Dwight D. Eisenhower received about 40 percent of the black vote. Incredibly high by today's standard but by my math doesn't equate to "most". Finally the social programs King supported definitely do not point to any definition of "Conservative Republican" I am familiar with especially by today's standard. I don't know that King's anti-war stance does either.

I'm not suggesting he was a Democrat but there is little to suggest he was a Republican. Sorry but the fact that he was a preacher isn't evidence of anything other than his belief in God. Neither political party really aligns with his life work and I would suspect he was suspicious of politicians in general especially after Richard Nixon passed on coming to his aid.

Still looking for your impartial source. I won't hold my breath but interested.

https://www.politifact.com/texas/statem ... was-repub/
 
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 5:53 pm
Location: Kirkland, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Moe Gibbs on Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:51 pm

Respect is earned, not granted.
The same goes for Racial Equality.
You can try to grant it [artificially] with laws, but true equality needs to be earned.
Every other ethnic group in the USA was discriminated against and had to earn the respect of others with hard work and by building good, trustworthy reputations.
 
Posts: 5457
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:30 pm

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Coug Tracks on Mon Jan 21, 2019 7:16 pm

Moe Gibbs wrote:Respect is earned, not granted.
The same goes for Racial Equality.
You can try to grant it [artificially] with laws, but true equality needs to be earned.
Every other ethnic group in the USA was discriminated against and had to earn the respect of others with hard work and by building good, trustworthy reputations.
I actually agree in spirit but that's not how things have gone down from a historical perspective in this country as much as you might want to believe that's the case. King's words of course are better than mine:

"Now there is another myth that still gets around: it is a kind of over reliance on the bootstrap philosophy. There are those who still feel that if the Negro is to rise out of poverty, if the Negro is to rise out of the slum conditions, if he is to rise out of discrimination and segregation, he must do it all by himself. And so they say the Negro must lift himself by his own bootstraps.

They never stop to realize that no other ethnic group has been a slave on American soil. The people who say this never stop to realize that the nation made the black man’s color a stigma. But beyond this they never stop to realize the debt that they owe a people who were kept in slavery two hundred and forty-four years.

In 1863 the Negro was told that he was free as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation being signed by Abraham Lincoln. But he was not given any land to make that freedom meaningful. It was something like keeping a person in prison for a number of years and suddenly discovering that that person is not guilty of the crime for which he was convicted. And you just go up to him and say, "Now you are free," but you don’t give him any bus fare to get to town. You don’t give him any money to get some clothes to put on his back or to get on his feet again in life.

Every court of jurisprudence would rise up against this, and yet this is the very thing that our nation did to the black man. It simply said, "You’re free," and it left him there penniless, illiterate, not knowing what to do. And the irony of it all is that at the same time the nation failed to do anything for the black man, though an act of Congress was giving away millions of acres of land in the West and the Midwest. Which meant that it was willing to undergird its white peasants from Europe with an economic floor.

But not only did it give the land, it built land-grant colleges to teach them how to farm. Not only that, it provided county agents to further their expertise in farming; not only that, as the years unfolded it provided low interest rates so that they could mechanize their farms. And to this day thousands of these very persons are receiving millions of dollars in federal subsidies every years not to farm. And these are so often the very people who tell Negroes that they must lift themselves by their own bootstraps. It’s all right to tell a man to lift himself by his own bootstraps, but it is a cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps.

We must come to see that the roots of racism are very deep in our country, and there must be something positive and massive in order to get rid of all the effects of racism and the tragedies of racial injustice."

Full speech: https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king ... king-jr-10
 
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat May 12, 2012 5:53 pm
Location: Kirkland, WA

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby Moe Gibbs on Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:34 pm

Coug Tracks wrote:
Moe Gibbs wrote:Respect is earned, not granted.
The same goes for Racial Equality.
You can try to grant it [artificially] with laws, but true equality needs to be earned.
Every other ethnic group in the USA was discriminated against and had to earn the respect of others with hard work and by building good, trustworthy reputations.
I actually agree in spirit but that's not how things have gone down from a historical perspective in this country as much as you might want to believe that's the case. King's words of course are better than mine:

"Now there is another myth that still gets around: it is a kind of over reliance on the bootstrap philosophy. There are those who still feel that if the Negro is to rise out of poverty, if the Negro is to rise out of the slum conditions, if he is to rise out of discrimination and segregation, he must do it all by himself. And so they say the Negro must lift himself by his own bootstraps.

They never stop to realize that no other ethnic group has been a slave on American soil. The people who say this never stop to realize that the nation made the black man’s color a stigma. But beyond this they never stop to realize the debt that they owe a people who were kept in slavery two hundred and forty-four years.

In 1863 the Negro was told that he was free as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation being signed by Abraham Lincoln. But he was not given any land to make that freedom meaningful. It was something like keeping a person in prison for a number of years and suddenly discovering that that person is not guilty of the crime for which he was convicted. And you just go up to him and say, "Now you are free," but you don’t give him any bus fare to get to town. You don’t give him any money to get some clothes to put on his back or to get on his feet again in life.

Every court of jurisprudence would rise up against this, and yet this is the very thing that our nation did to the black man. It simply said, "You’re free," and it left him there penniless, illiterate, not knowing what to do. And the irony of it all is that at the same time the nation failed to do anything for the black man, though an act of Congress was giving away millions of acres of land in the West and the Midwest. Which meant that it was willing to undergird its white peasants from Europe with an economic floor.

But not only did it give the land, it built land-grant colleges to teach them how to farm. Not only that, it provided county agents to further their expertise in farming; not only that, as the years unfolded it provided low interest rates so that they could mechanize their farms. And to this day thousands of these very persons are receiving millions of dollars in federal subsidies every years not to farm. And these are so often the very people who tell Negroes that they must lift themselves by their own bootstraps. It’s all right to tell a man to lift himself by his own bootstraps, but it is a cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps.

We must come to see that the roots of racism are very deep in our country, and there must be something positive and massive in order to get rid of all the effects of racism and the tragedies of racial injustice."

Full speech: https://kinginstitute.stanford.edu/king ... king-jr-10


When does this old, tired excuse that I've heard one thousand times become totally irrelevant..?
The year 2100 when the last living slave has been dead for 180 years..?
Perhaps 2050..?
In the year 2100, the only major improvement to the Negro Race will have come from the extensive cross breeding program that is being promoted by the NWO via television, Hollywood, etc. right now as I speak.
Some crossbreeding would occur naturally without any NWO Social Engineering. When this happens, it gives the Negro Race a Rocket Sled ride forward by 50,000 years on an evolutionary scale. If no other races but the Negro ever walked the Earth, the world population would still be in the low millions, average life expectancies in the low 30's and there would be no such thing as man made electrical systems.
 
Posts: 5457
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:30 pm

Re: Happy Martin Luther King Day Everybody

Postby HawkBowler on Tue Jan 22, 2019 8:56 am

Coug Tracks wrote:
It's factually inaccurate to characterize "most blacks" as Republican's at this time or whatever time you are speaking to that fits your narrative.


Which party supported segregation in MLK's time? Which party was full of KKK members? It was the Democrats. They were the ones behind resistance to integrating schools and separate water fountains for blacks and whites.

I'm not suggesting he was a Democrat but there is little to suggest he was a Republican. Sorry but the fact that he was a preacher isn't evidence of anything other than his belief in God. Neither political party really aligns with his life work and I would suspect he was suspicious of politicians in general especially after Richard Nixon passed on coming to his aid.


Nixon reached out to MLK and listened to him when the Dems would not:

https://www.thedailybeast.com/when-mart ... re-friends

I agree that MLK probably didn't trust anyone in government until JFK and Bobby came to his aid to spring him out of jail. Even then he probably didn't trust the Democrat party, because again, they were the party of slavery and segregation.

Below is an article that explains why MLK was conservative:

http://humanevents.com/2006/08/16/why-m ... epublican/

Very hard to argue that MLK wasn't conservative. And yes, being a baptist preacher tells us a lot about his values. He definitely was not an anti-christian socialist like much of the Dem party today.

MLK would be horrified by the Dems of today because they're using the antithesis of the model he popularized -- judge by character not content of skin color. The Dems of today do the exact opposite.

The Democrats have been distorting the civil rights movement for decades now. They went from controlling blacks through segregation to controlling blacks through welfare and 'we love you while the other side is racist and hates you.'
 
Posts: 16609
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 7:46 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Next

Return to Rant and Rave - Politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

Advertising